Kab hai Holi? Holi kab hai?

the color festival is here, and it’s time to bring out the gulaal, gujiyas, and how about.

Sweets tend to be homemade, but local markets are usually packed with a whole range of colors such as powders, dyes and sprays. They may look bright and vibrant, but these colors are usually loaded with synthetic chemicals and Hazardous Material to like heavy metals, sand, asbestos, chalk, and silica, among others.

But, we go back to the days when Holi was celebrated with colors made of flowers, spices and other plant materials. A number of Indian startups today are doing herbal and environmentally friendly colors accessible to as many people as possible today.

Your story curated a list of startups that will help you play an organic and green Holi.

Mitti Ke Rang

Founded in 2014 by Sanket Deshmukh and Amit Jain, social enterprise Mitti Ke Rang is a e-commerce portal who helps women entrepreneurs sell their products online.

The startup has also launched compostable natural dyes handcrafted from plants and finely filtered, to make Holi even more colorful, toxin-free, and ecological. All these colors are made by hand by craftswomen in the Uttarakhand region and are 100% organic and chemical free.

These hypoallergenic colors are made from dried flower petals and herbal and natural ingredients like turmeric, neem, beetroot and tesu. They are packaged in fully recyclable and biodegradable boxes.

iTokri

Founded in 2012 by Nitin Pamnani and Jia Pamnani, based in Gwalior Inasmuch asiTokriInasmuch as sells handicrafts and handmade products. It also sells handmade organic and plant-based colors.

iTokri serves a variety of ecological and natural gulaals which claim to be completely safe for children, the elderly and pets. The colors are made of orchids, pink and red roses, organic turmeric, mehandi and palak leaves, and are non-allergic and stain-free on skin and hair. A single gulaal pack is priced at Rs 95 and a four pack is available for Rs 350.

Nirmalaya

Founded in 2019 by Surbhi Bansal, Bharat Bansal, and Delhi-based social enterprise Rajeev Bansal Nirmalaya offers biological and premium aromatic products for the holiday of Holi.

Nirmalaya aims to use religious waste including flower petals which are collected and recycled to produce organic products with natural fragrances. The vision is to “change the way our society works and use religious products to reduce the pollution of waterways that occurs through the disposal of petals thrown into water”.

Nirmalaya’s organic gulaals are without chemicals and safe for IIRT certified human skin. Holi herbal colors are made from dried flower petals and natural ingredients like turmeric, neem and palate. A single gulaal pack is priced at Rs 125 and a four pack is available for Rs 499.

Phool.co

Founded in 2017 by Ankit Agarwal, based in Kanpur Inasmuch asPhoolInasmuch as collects floral waste from mosques and temples in Uttar Pradesh. Waste is handcrafted by women from disadvantaged backgrounds of the company in natural fertilizer through the flower cycle.

It offers incense sticks, vermicompost and incense cones. All products are 100% biodegradable and can be buried after use. They can also be customized to any size, shape and strength.

The startup also offers herbal, natural, and vibrating gulaal for holidays based on Costs and rich herbs, temple flower waste and rice powder. These are certified skin safe by the Center for Cruelty-Free Testing.

My Pooja Box

Founded in 2017 by Kaveri Sachdev, based in New Delhi Inasmuch asMy Pooja BoxInasmuch as offers spiritual products and poop boxes for religious occasions across India. The startup has created a herbal gulaal collection for Holi, with colors that are “all natural and herbal”.

The colors are made of organic ingredients to like herbs, flowers, edibles, fruit and vegetable extracts and chocolate, and are safe for skin and hair. They are also environmentally friendly. The range starts from a single color pack from Rs 99 to Rs a 1,999 basket that includes a silver pichkari with a bucket.

Edited by Teja Lele Desai